US Involvement in the Gulf War and the Iraq War (2003)

Abstract I’m going to compare two wars, the Gulf War and the Iraq War caused by the U.S. and Iraq in my thesis because it is necessary for understanding the recent situation in Iraq to reconsider those wars which affected Saddam Hussein’s dictatorship and finally overthrew his government. These two wars can involve today’s cruel and unreasonable situation in Iraq. At the beginning, I’ll describe case studies of these wars. This section is based on the historical facts that are related with them because understanding the correct history is essential for getting our head around the complicated confrontation between the U.S. and Iraq. After that, I try to find some similarities between the Gulf War and the Iraq War. Also I’m going to research the points of difference between the Gulf War and the Iraq one. These processes will help us to comprehend what the Iraq War was. Finally, I will consider the continuity of these two wars and prove that the result of the Gulf War is the indirect cause of the Iraq war which is also the indirect cause of the recent terrible situation in Iraq where the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) is acting so violently.   1.Introduction We are not able to say that the recent situation of Iraq is stable. The Iraqi government and other countries such as the U.S, the U.K, and Turkey are fighting against the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS), which means a civil war is happening in Iraq. If the cause of the civil war was the national administration in Iraq, the Iraq War in 2003 was also the origin of it because the war changed Iraq’s framework with which Saddam Hussein enforced his autocracy. Moreover, the origin of the Iraq war, the trigger of planting a serious threat from Hussein to the United States, was the Gulf War because the U.S. couldn’t overthrow Hussein in the Gulf War and feared that he kept weapons of mass destruction (WMD). So the U.S. tried to justify the attack against Hussein and began that. On the basis of this course, this time I want to research about “US Involvement in the Gulf War and the Iraq War (2003)”. Checking the shift of the U.S. policy on Iraq to show how the U.S. decided to act against Iraq, the complex situation in Iraq will be made clear. I hope the process linking to the recent situation will be shown through my work.   2. Case study of the Gulf War One cause of the Gulf War was Iraq’s invasion of Kuwait on August 2nd, 1990. After the Iran-Iraq War, Iraq had a problem of abundant troops. They could not get jobs because of a depression in Iraq. So Hussein was unable to free their military service. In addition, if Iraq invaded Kuwait, Hussein could control the 20% of oil deposits around the world. Eventually, Hussein chose the way of increasing military power. On August 8th, 1990, the U.S. government announced 200,000 American soldiers were going to Saudi Arabia in order to defend the U.S. against Iraq power. This act was for preventing the producers of oil from being subjected by Iraq, too. If Iraq had got the concession, the U.S. would have had trouble because the balance of power would have been broken in the Middle East if Iraq invaded Kuwait to get plenty of oil. The U.S. had to avoid this situation. On November 8th, the U.S. decided to increase the troops going to Iraq. President George H. W. Bush said that this increasing military power was needed to ensure the appropriate and aggressive attack option of the multinational force which shared the same goal that Hussein withdraw from Kuwait. We can read the U.S. government’s expectation that it wanted to carry the reprisal quickly to Iraq through military power aimed at that country. On November 29th, Security Council Resolution (678) was passed by a vote in the United Nations Security Council. This resolution said that if Iraq ignored past Security Council Resolutions and did not withdraw from Kuwait by January 15th, 1991, the United Nations Security Council could admit signatories to do all measures against Iraq, including use of military force. Iraq negotiated with America behind closed doors. However, Iraq did not withdraw from Kuwait by the deadline eventually. On January 17th, 1991, 530,000 multinational forces composed mainly of American troops began to bomb strategic bases of the Iraqi force. On February 24th, the land war started and the Iraqi force was expelled from Kuwait on February 28th. The multinational force won overwhelmingly in the Gulf War. However, we have to notice subsequent acts by George H.W. Bush. He ordered the stop of fighting against Iraq when it withdrew from Kuwait. It was difficult for the U.S. to overthrow Hussein’s government because Security Council Resolution (678) did not include that purpose. Also, Paul Wolfowitz, the Under Secretary of Defense for Policy in the George H.W. Bush Administration, said that the U.S. had to take responsibility if a new Iraqi government was built which meant the U.S. would occupy that place forever but this action could raise up anger among Iraqi people. In addition, Norman Schwarzkopf, the Commander of the U.S. Central Command, said that he did not know how much damage U.S. soldiers would take if the Gulf War kept going. George H. W. Bush did not act beyond the justified aim. He followed “Collaborationism” with other countries and the UN. After the Gulf War, economic sanctions on Iraq were imposed by the United Nations. Long-term sanctions made the Iraqi economy so stagnant, but Hussein’s government could survive. “The UN failed to disarm Hussein and this mistake was due to acts of the Allied Forces which set much too high a value on international agreements,” 71st Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, Margaret Thatcher said.       3. Process from the Gulf War to the Iraq War After the Gulf War, the U.S. showed off the use of military force against Iraq because Hussein did not obey the UN resolution after the war. This Iraqi attitude made the White House being cautious. In the government, there were two thoughts of dealing with Iraq. The first one was that Iraq was a potential threat but the U.S. did not have too much fear that Iraq would have huge power which would threaten the U.S. and its allies.  So the U.S. and the UN did not use military power but instead imposed economic sanctions on Iraq. Simultaneously, the U.S. helped anti-establishment groups in Iraq. These actions made the Hussein Regime weaker. The second opinion was that the U.S. should break off the origin of the potential enemy. This meant the U.S. should use military power against Iraq again because Iraq was “a threat” although it was located far from the U.S. and its allies.  The Clinton Administration tried to overthrow Hussein by helping anti-establishment groups behind closed doors but this plan failed because of the internal split among anti groups. In 1996, the UN removed the economic sanctions against Iraq because the economy of Iraq had become exhausted. This action helped Hussein to recover power. But he did not follow the UN resolution which allowed the UN inspectorate to examine suspected places. Actually, Hussein accepted inspection but did not allow it in important places such as the head office of the Ba’ath Party. Seeing those actions of Hussein, the Clinton Administration decided on the use of bombing against Iraq. The U.S. attacked the intelligence and missile bases, and factories of chemical weapons. However, the Hussein Administration could still survive and stiffen its attitude against the UN and the U.S.   4. Case study of the U.S. in the Iraq War (2003) In January, 2001, George W. Bush was inaugurated as President. He came to office thinking that unilateralism was the appropriate way to protect interests of the U.S. On September 11th, 2001, synchronized terrorist attacks happened in the U.S. The government petitioned Afghanistan’s government to hand over Osama bin Laden to America because it believed he had ordered those attacks. However, Afghanistan refused to do that. Eventually, the U.S. decided to use military force in Afghanistan and tried to capture him through this war. However, the U.S. could not catch him finally. The U.S. tried to link the Afghanistan War with the Iraq war because the U.S. wanted to shut out Iran, a country which had potential military and economic power in the Middle East, between Afghanistan and Iraq. The U.S. had already overwhelmed Afghanistan. So the remaining problem was Iraq where Hussein had a dictatorship. In the fall of 2001, the Pentagon already planned “the Iraq War”. At the beginning of 2002, Donald Rumsfeld, Secretary of Defense, conferred with Tommy Franks, Commander of the U.S. Central Command, about the plan of the invasion of Iraq. Actually, the policy of occupying was decided in spring, 2002. The U.S. considered the war against Iraq at an early stage. The reason is that the threat of Hussein increased excessively because of the terrorist attacks on 9.11. The Cabinet showed three ways of overthrowing Hussein. The first one was invading areas controlled by anti-establishment groups against Hussein in the north and south of Iraq. This way would make those groups attack Hussein and his government could be broken. The second way was causing a coup in Iraq. The U.S. thought it could overturn Hussein. Finally, the third plan was throwing troops into Iraq. The members of Cabinet considered which way was the best to overthrow the Hussein Government. They thought that the first one was not appropriate because this way would take a lot of time and anti-establishment groups did not have enough power to beat Hussein. Members also thought that accordingly the U.S. would intervene in Iraq and save those groups with its military power. So they dismissed this way. Moreover, they also thought that the second way was not good because if the Iraqi force could beat Hussein, the successor would be a military officer who belonged to the inner circle of the Hussein Government. This only meant a “New Hussein” would appear. Thus, the Cabinet members thought there was nothing to do but the third way. However, there were confrontations about the attack on Iraq among some members of the Cabinet. “Hussein was an expert of trickery and escape and good at rejection and scam. So there was no guarantee that Hussein would follow the UN resolutions if the UN inspectorate went back to Iraq,” Vice-President Dick Cheney said. Through this idea, he tried to justify Unilateralism. On the other hand, Colin Powell, Secretary of State, demurred at Unilateralism. “The U.S. should act with friendly nations and allies which had the same opinions as the U.S,” he said. This difference would occur because of experience of military service. Cheney had no experience in the military but Powell had followed military service. He had experience as a soldier in the Vietnam War. On January 29th, 2002, President George W. Bush gave his State of the Union Address. In the speech, he called Iraq, Iran, North Korea, “the axis of evil” and criticized these countries for having weapons of mass destruction (WMD). On September 20th, the National Security Council Text entitled the “National Security Strategy of the United States” was published. This text had main three points. The first point was that the U.S. did not forgive preemptive attacks from the rogue state or terrorists. This meant the U.S. was willing to strike enemies first. The U.S. thought that the effective way of minimizing the use of WMDs by enemies was making it impossible for them to do that. So it said the first attack was important. The second point was holding up “Unilateralism”. The U.S. would act by itself without hesitation if people in the U.S. were endangered by terrorists and the rogue state. The third one is persisting in freedom and democracy. The U.S. emphasized the value of democracy. Also, the U.S. said the ultimate goal of fighting against terrorism was protecting that value. George W. Bush tried to justify the attack against Iraq through this document. But this is just the idea which the U.S. showed by itself. The justification of a fight against Iraq through this document was weaker than a UN Security Council Resolution, like the one used in 1990. On November 8th, the United Nations Security Council unanimously adopted UN Security Council Resolution (1441). This resolution required that Iraq had to accept unconditional and unlimited inspection from the UN and if Iraq did not follow this decision, “serious results” would be brought through the Security Council. Through this resolution, the UN criticized serious Iraqi violations of past resolutions and warned that more violations would bring about severe consequences. However, when President George W. Bush emphasized the threat of Iraq in the State of the Union Address on January 29th, 2003, some countries, such as France and Germany, doubted the attitude of the United States because Gerhard Schröder, the 7th Chancellor of Germany, advocated that the Middle East needed not war but peace and the UN should deal with Iraq by making a strict inspection for WMDs. Also, an other reason was that France remembered the attack on Iraq by the U.S. and the U.K without the UN Security Council Resolution in 1998 and Jacques Chirac, the 22nd President of France, criticized the extension of inspections by the UN and that war without approval of the UN Security Council was not legal. Read more…